Sampdoria

In the sparkling city of Genoa, a fabled football story unfolds. Amid the smell of fresh focaccia and saltwater, Unione Calcio Sampdoria, lovingly known as Sampdoria, commands the football field. Let’s whisk ourselves into the story of this Serie A mainstay and discover its history, star players, and electrifying rivalries.

July 27
Sat
01:00 pm
July 27, Sat, 01:00 pm
MDCC-Arena - Magdeburg
July 30
Tue
06:00 pm
July 30, Tue, 06:00 pm
Ernst-Abbe-Sportfeld - Jena

A Noble Blue-Circled Legacy: Sampdoria in Serie A

Sampdoria’s history in Serie A is akin to a heart-stopping rollercoaster ride. They began their journey in 1946, born from the merger of two clubs, Sampierdarenese and Andrea Doria. Since then, Sampdoria has alternated between dazzling highs and testing lows.

Their pinnacle arrived in the 1990-91 season under Vujadin Boškov. Sampdoria clinched their first and only Scudetto, Italy’s top-tier league championship. Boškov’s boys not only dominated domestically but also made waves in Europe, reaching the European Cup final the following season. Despite a heart-wrenching loss to Barcelona, their continental exploits remain a source of pride for Sampdoria fans.

Sampdoria’s Storied Stars: Legends of the Past and Present

Sampdoria’s narrative is studded with stellar talents who’ve left an indelible mark on the club. Roberto Mancini, an iconic forward, was pivotal in their Scudetto-winning campaign. Another notable name is Gianluca Vialli, a formidable striker who later showcased his prowess with Juventus and Chelsea.

Sampdoria is also a beloved launchpad for rising stars. Bruno Fernandes, now a linchpin at Manchester United, enjoyed a fruitful spell in Genoa, developing his craft before illuminating the Premier League.

Electric Encounters: Sampdoria’s Fierce Rivalries

Rivalries are the lifeblood of football, and Sampdoria’s fiercest foes are no doubt Genoa CFC in the Derby della Lanterna. Matches between these two are always heated, with the Luigi Ferraris Stadium transforming into a cauldron of emotions.

Outside Serie A, Sampdoria has developed notable rivalries with other European clubs. Their Champions League run in the early 90s sparked intense bouts with Red Star Belgrade and Barcelona, adding another fascinating chapter to their story.

Basking in the Blues: The Luigi Ferraris Stadium Experience

Nestled amidst the bustling city of Genoa, Luigi Ferraris Stadium, known as “Marassi”, is a must-visit for any Sampdoria supporter. The ‘Gradinata Sud’, home to Sampdoria’s ultras, is the heart of the stadium, pulsating with energy. For a more casual experience, the ‘Tribuna Centrale offers fantastic panoramic views of the pitch.

Ticket prices vary, with the Tribuna Centrale being the priciest, ranging from 60-90 euros. For those seeking a budget-friendly experience, the Gradinata Sud and Nord are perfect, with tickets starting at 25 euros.

Supporting Sampdoria: Your Love, Their Pride

In the end, supporting Sampdoria is an exciting adventure. From witnessing historic Serie A battles, cheering on star players, and experiencing intense rivalries, to basking in the atmosphere at Luigi Ferraris, it’s a journey soaked in pure, exhilarating football passion. And no matter where you sit, or how much you pay, remember, your support fuels Sampdoria’s journey. So, put on your blue-circled jersey, and join the beautiful, clamorous carnival that is Sampdoria football.

The Story isn’t Over

  • Iconic Symbol: Sampdoria’s badge is quite distinctive. It features a sailor, known as Baciccia, which is a typical character of Genoese culture, symbolizing the city’s maritime heritage.
  • Champion Producers: Sampdoria has a knack for nurturing talent. Apart from Bruno Fernandes, other big names such as World Cup winner Mauro Germán Camoranesi and Argentine star Sergio Romero also spent time in the Genoese club, honing their skills.
  • Record Holders: Despite the relatively smaller size of their trophy cabinet, Sampdoria holds a unique record. They are the last team to have won the Coppa Italia before it was utterly dominated by the big clubs – Juventus, Roma, Lazio, and Inter Milan.
  • European Glory: Sampdoria is one of the few Italian clubs that have won the Cup Winners’ Cup. They clinched the title in the 1989-90 season, further establishing their stature in European football.
  • Film Connection: Italian director Paolo Agazzi featured Sampdoria in his film “El Día que murió el silencio” (The Day Silence Died). In the movie, a character receives a Sampdoria shirt, showing the club’s impact extending beyond sports and into popular culture.